Digital Estate Planning

What happens to my iTunes Music library after I die?

There are no mechanisms in place to put in place a succession plan for your iTunes Music Libary. There are in fact valid arguments that you do not have the right to pass that ownership on. For example, this Apple Communities conversation, or a number of other articles which can be easily found on Google on this topic.

But is there a workaround?

The short answer is maybe! Apple allows you to share your purchases with members of your family by setting up Family Sharing. Family Sharing makes it easy for you and your family to share iTunes, Apple Books and App Store; an Apple Music family plan; and an iCloud storage plan. You can also choose to share photo albums and family calendars on top of sharing your location within the family.

What is Apple Family Sharing?

Family Sharing is the mechanisms with which Apple allows the sharing of iTunes, Apple Books and App Store purchases; an Apple Music family subscription; a single iCloud storage plan; and more. One adult, the organiser, chooses the features and invites the members that make up the Family Sharing profile. From there everyone within that family gets access to everything else purchased by other members. Go here to Set up Family Sharing.

What happens to my Apple products after I die? (iPod; iPhone; iPad; Apple Watch; AirPods; Apple TV)

Unfortunately, there are no Apple policies that directly address the need to access the Apple Products of a deceased owner. There is an example of Apple Communities conversations where the questioner is asked to bring, in this case, the Apple Watch into the store with a copy of the death certificate in order to get access to the device.

What happens to my Apple Mac products after I die? (MacBook; Air; Pro; iMac; Mac Mini)

Again, unfortunately, there is no Apple policy that we can point to regarding obtaining access to the Apple Products of a deceased owner. There is, unfortunately, an example of Apple Communities conversations where the questioner is pointed to the standard process of wiping clean an Apple product before a sale as a means of obtaining access without the password.


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